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Linux append to zip file

linux append to zip file

Mondo will treat the partition as a biggiefile. The user should use ‘-x /dev/hda1’ (or whichever device the Windows partition resides). Windows NT4/2K/XP typically use the NTFS file system, not VFAT. The user may not edit that partition’s size at restore-time (for obvious reasons). Mondo will also add an entry to the mountlist to reflect the size and type of the partition.

If not, well, you need a refund. 🙂 If your drive doesn’t play nicely with Mondo then you may try tinkering with setblksize and defblksize using ‘mt’, or tweaking Mondo’s block size by recompiling it with make INTTAPE=4096 or INTTAPE=8192 or something. Also, depending on the tape streamer model, a tape should be inserted in the tape drive before starting mondoarchive, otherwise it may not recognize the drive. Other than that, you need a priest or a refund. 🙂 Mondo plays nicely with any sane, sensible drives. That’s most of them, by the way. A: If your tape drive and its firmware and the kernel-level driver support fopen(), fread(), fwrite() and fclose() – standard C library calls – then yes, Mondo should support it.

Or, you can boot from the Mindi media (mindi. The resultant ISO’s can be burned to CD’s if you want (which isn’t a good idea unless you’re a Mondo expert because they’ll try to restore over a network by default, which is silly because the archives are on the CD’s). Iso) and hit ENTER a few times to restore.

Do not attempt to compress files named with the given suffixes. Such files are simply stored (0% compression) in the output zip file, so that zip doesn’t waste its time trying to compress them. The suffixes are separated by either colons or semicolons.

linux append to zip file

Interactive Mode is for people who have lost a subset of data from their live file system, or perhaps who have lost some data from their latest backup and want to restore a subset of data from an earlier backup. The interactive mode will provide an ‘Editing mountlist screen’ that allows you to setup a different disk geometry. If you want to restore only some files or if you do not want to prep/format your drives, then you should boot into Interactive Mode.

One of the formats it understands is “binary”, which is basicly any file that’s not in one of the other formats that it understands. So you’ve probably envisioned the idea: convert the file that we want to embed into an object file, then it can simply be linked in with the rest of our code. Objcopy converts object files or executables from one format to another. And there is, it’s objcopy to the rescue.

If the embedded data is not uniform, then char is probably the most convenient: take its address and cast the pointer to the proper type as you traverse the data. H> extern char _binary_data_txt_start; extern char _binary_data_txt_end; main() { char* p = &_binary_data_txt_start; while ( p. I declare them as type char because it’s convenient for this example: the embedded data is character data. However, you could declare them as anything, as int if the data is an array of integers, or as struct foo_bar_t if the data were any array of foo bars. = &_binary_data_txt_end ) putchar( *p++) ; } One important and subtle thing to note is that the symbols added to the object file aren’t “variables”. They don’t contain any data, rather, their address is their value. The code to actually use the embedded file should now be reasonably obvious: #include

linux append to zip file

Shut down all possible applications (this minimizes any compare differences following the backup). Especially shutdown properly any running database on your system, as the recovery may lead to corrupted data. Or if applicable, boot to single user mode.

UNIX Commands for DBAs This article contains a brief list of commands that most UNIX DBAs will need on a regular basis. File and Directory Navigation (find, grep, alias).

Seek worked for my case. I needed to append lines to a zip archived txt file. Actually only Jon’s answer (Sep 5 ’11 at 9:37) with BaseStream.

If foo contains the subdirectories tom, dick, and harry, you can:. If you are short on disk space, you might not have enough room to hold both the original directory and the corresponding compressed zip archive. In this case, you can create the archive in steps using the -m option.

From zip(1): When given the name of an existing zip archive, zip will replace identically named entries in the zip archive or add entries for new .

linux append to zip file

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